Blog

See the person, not the condition!

Friday 24th May 2019

How our children continue to teach us life lessons every day. It's interesting really. When we understand Dementia and the stigma that it comes with, we only seem to see the person with their illness at the front of our mind. But why is that? These people are full of character, personality and incredible stories. They each have individual needs and wants, just like everyone else. We all love the same, each walk the same earth, each breathes the same air and drink the same water. And still, we are all guilty of seeing their vulnerability first. What happens if we see their strength first? Their courage? Their memories and their tales? Just like the youth of today, we can do our best to really…

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The power of music

Tuesday 16th April 2019

People respond to music from a very early age, even before words and language are developed. This continues even towards the end of our lives, when verbal abilities may be lost. Music accesses different parts of the brain to language, so it can be used to communicate or engage with someone who has been diagnosed with dementia, even if they no longer speak or respond to words. Music can also be a useful way to change somebody's mood, especially during personal care. If a person diagnosed with dementia resists efforts to help them get dressed, playing soothing music or a favourite song can help lessen any distress. Playlists offer a great way of capturing all the songs or pieces…

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A grandchild for a day keeps dementia at bay!

Saturday 3rd November 2018

Are you watching that Channel 4 programme, Old People's Home for 4 Year-Olds? I always make time to see it because I love the interaction between the kids and the pensioners. But it's not all about the entertainment. There are other reasons I watch. A study by the Journal of North America's Menopause Society followed 376 grandparents and 340 children for 19 years and they found that there really are benefits to babysitting the grandkids... The Society identified that the closer the relationship between the ageing grandparents and the children, the less likely either party was to suffer from depression. Just think about that for a moment. The damaging effects of social isolation can be overcome by spending time with…

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Staying safe this Halloween

Monday 29th October 2018

Halloween can be a treat-filled time for many, but also tricky for some. For people living with dementia or physical limitations, Halloween can hold fears that lead to distress. At Your Care, we've put together some pointers to make Halloween enjoyable for all. For relatives of vulnerable people: Always put the door chain on and look out of the window or spy hole to see who is there before opening the door. Take particular care if there is more than one person on your doorstep Ensure the walkway is kept clear to avoid falls and have lights on. Don't answer the door in the dark If you don't feel safe opening the door, then don't. Only open the door if you feel…

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Getting through winter with dementia

Saturday 27th October 2018

Twice a year, we all get to be time travellers. Not quite like Marty McFly in Back To The Future, (although I would like to visit 1955), but this weekend we get to relive an hour. And it's for this reason that I ask you to spare a thought for those caring for an individual living with dementia. Dementia causes visuospatial problems which become worse during the darker days and nights, leading to disorientation and frustration. Those with Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) can have depressive episodes due to the lack of daylight; especially during winter. Similarly, people living with sun downing (a condition that occurs towards the end of the day) can become agitated, distressed or irritated and longer evenings…

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